_content Page 2

  • 9:10 am on April 27, 2012 Permalink

    I’ve come up with this Windows PowerShell script to help identify virtual machines that have snapshots older than 1 day. It generates a CSV file and emails specified recipients. This is particularly handy in large VMware environments where snapshots can cause major havoc on datastore utilization. Enjoy!

    
    # ==============================================================================================
    # NAME: vmwaresnapreport.ps1
    # AUTHOR: Eric Kiel erickielcollideoscopeorg
    # DATE  : 4/27/2012
    # COMMENT: This script will connect to a VMware Virtual Center server and report on VMs with snapshots
    # that are older than 1 day.
    # VERSION: 1.0 - Original Code
    # USAGE: .\vmwaresnapreport.ps1
    # Variables: 
    # $vcenter - vCenter host name
    # $vcenterdomain - domain that vCenter resides in; yourdomain.com
    # $mailserver - SMTP Mail relay
    # $email1 - Distribution list or email address to send report to
    # $email2 - 2nd distribution list or email address for reporting
    # REQUIREMENTS: VMware vSphere PowerCLI
    # ==============================================================================================
    
    #Initialize Variables
    $vcenter = "YOUR VCENTER HOST NAME"
    $vcenterdomain = "VCENTER DOMAIN"
    $mailserver = "YOUR SMTP SERVER"
    $email1 = "YOUR DISTRIBUTION LIST OR EMAIL ADDRESS"
    $email2 = "DISTRIBUTION LIST 2 OR ANOTHER EMAIL ADDRESS"
    
    # Enable VMware Snap-in
    add-pssnapin VMware.VimAutomation.Core
    
    $date = get-date -format MM-dd-yyyy
    connect-viserver $vcenter
    Get-VM | Get-Snapshot | Where { $_.Created -lt (Get-Date).AddDays(-1)} | select VM, Name, Description, Created, PowerState, SizeMB | export-csv $date-$vcenter-snapshots.csv -notypeinformation
    send-mailmessage -from "$vcenter@$vcenterdomain" -to "$email1", "$email2" -subject "$vcenter Snapshot Report for $date" -attachment "$date-$vcenter-snapshots.csv" -body "Snapshot report for $vcenter generated on $date" -smtpserver $mailserver
    

    Download vmwaresnapreport and rename to .ps1 to run with PowerShell.

     
  • 7:56 pm on April 4, 2012 Permalink

    Just over a year. That is far too long to let this site sit and go to waste. I’m in the process of cooking up some articles so look forward to them as I’ve learned a lot in the past year. I’ve moved all of my projects to erickiel.com so go check them out. I’m also working on an update to the OpenNote theme – look forward to better code handling as well as a darker theme that is easier on the eyes and inspired by Crunchbang. See you soon!

     
  • 12:50 pm on March 16, 2011 Permalink

    Now that I’m managing a few linux servers (personal, not work related), I’ve found it handy to have automatic login via ssh-keys. At first it wasn’t so bad copying keys up to the server, but when you have 5 or so, it becomes a bit tedious (especially when I can never remember things). I’ve found a script to automate the process from StackOverflow:

    #!/bin/bash
    if [ -z "$1" ]; then
    	echo "colonize.sh by Brian Enigma "
    	echo "Function: copies ssh public keys to remote machines for passwordless login"
    	echo "Usage: colonize.sh @"
    	exit 1
    fi
    KEY=id_rsa.pub
    STORE=authorized_keys
    CONTENT=`cat ~/.ssh/$KEY`
    echo "Attaching key to authorized_keys file"
    ssh $1 "mkdir -p .ssh && chmod 700 .ssh && touch .ssh/$STORE \
    	&& chmod 644 .ssh/$STORE \
    	&& echo '$CONTENT' >> .ssh/$STORE \
    	&& rm -f $KEY"
    echo "Complete!  You should be able to log in without a password now!"

    Note that before this works, you must have generated your keys on your local box first:

    ssh-keygen -t rsa
     
  • 8:20 pm on November 10, 2010 Permalink

    General list of apps I use on my Ubuntu desktop:

    thunderbird – great email client
    banshee – quite possibly the best music/media player out there
    vlc – this can play any movie you throw at it
    transmission-daemon – great for running transmission when you aren’t logged in to the machine
    ushare – unpn/dlna media server – works great with xbox 360
    filezilla – personal favorite ftp client
    pidgin – empathy sucks
    gnome-do – this helped me transfer finger memory from OS X
    gparted – I am a storage guy – I format and look at things.
    ssh – is there anything ssh can’t do?
    ubuntu-restricted-extras – youtube is boring without flash
    xchat – for when I’m feeling extra creepy
    vpnc – great cisco compatible vpn client
    network-manager-vpnc – makes it guiful
    ttf-droid – I love the android font
    audacity – I cut up mp3s too
    terminator – awesome terminal app

     
  • 7:49 am on August 25, 2010 Permalink

    I’ve had the E71 for a few days now and I find it to be one of the best phones I’ve used. It is interesting to me coming from a G1 and previously an iPhone, but clearly the E71 was designed to be a communication device, not “something to play games on and maybe make phone calls” like the iPhone or G1. Here are some of the “required” apps I have installed: Putty, Trill (Twitter client), Wordmobi (WordPress blog client), Skype, and finally JoikuSpot (wifi-hotspot). I’m still looking for other must have apps and will hopefully find more good stuff to share.

     
  • 6:06 am on August 12, 2010 Permalink

    OpenNote is a modified WordPress theme that is designed to be used for a private “notebook” site. I wanted a place to keep notes and other bits of information handy, but did not want to use any third party services such as Evernote because I wanted to keep it under my control. I had been using my hacked W2+ installation, but I needed functionality to better handle files such as pdf and Word documents. WordPress is extensible and reliable enough that it works nearly everywhere and there is an official WordPress application for nearly every phone so that makes adding content a snap from anywhere. I hope you enjoy the OpenNote theme and you can download it from the OpenNote Project page at erickiel.com. Let me know what you think!

     
  • 7:39 pm on August 5, 2010 Permalink

    “Those who desire to give up freedom in order to gain security will not have, nor do they deserve, either one.”

    Benjamin Franklin

     
  • 4:35 am on July 29, 2010 Permalink

    squid going for a walk

     
  • 6:42 am on May 5, 2010 Permalink

    I’ve had the latest version of Ubuntu installed for a few days now and I believe I can sum it up in one word: polished. This release has been the most stable and least troublesome yet. I’ve noticed that 9.10 my wireless connection would take ~10 seconds to connect, in Lucid it is nearly instantaneous. The boot time is considerably faster which is saying a lot as the boot time was slashed from 9.04 to 9.10. The new “me” menu is a nice addition and the overall look and feel is very nice. I must say, I was a bit confused about why they moved the minimize, maximize and close buttons to the left though, but after a day or so, it becomes second nature to mouse over to the left. Also, since the release, Mark Shuttleworth has detailed some new plans for Window Indicators which I think will be interesting. It is good to see some innovation and I think this can only be a good thing for Ubuntu.

    While this is all nice though, some of my favorite apps still do not have proxy support which is very frustrating. I wish I knew why there is no proxy support with these apps that should support a global proxy since the primary reason they exist is to utilize an internet connection. Empathy is a perfect example of this – why would you replace a long-standing application with good plugins and active development like Pidgin with Empathy? I believe that if you are replacing something, it should have the same or more features. What is even more frustrating though is that some of these apps such as Gwibber or Banshee don’t even tell you they can’t connect.

    Despite the proxy issues, which are minor and just annoying, this is a great release. Practically everything works as expected and I think this will be a great LTS release.

     
  • 6:41 am on April 23, 2010 Permalink

    I have to say this first since I’m looking to get a new phone shortly, but I love Android. It is open, stable and not too irritating. However, the fact that I have to use a Google account to use the phone is very annoying. I’ll say that I’ve grown a little apprehensive about what they collect, but I’ll save that for another day. But like I said, I do like Android and the fact that I can do whatever I want with it. Right now I’m using an unlocked G1 running Cyanogenmod and this is what I consider essential apps for Android in no particular order:

    Beem: great Jabber client – since I’m moving away from Google, this is a great alternative to the built in Talk app.

    Seesmic: nice and fast Twitter client. I used to use Twidroid, but I found that it was just annoying with the constant notifications, but that is just me.

    Advanced Task Manager: great for killing Twidroid.

    Aldiko Premium Boookreader: tons of free books to download here. I recommend Little Brother by Cory Doctorow. I read the entire thing on my Big Brother phone.

    Astro File Manager: handy for poking around the SD card.

    BeamReader: best PDF viewer I could find.

    CM Updater: upgrade your ROM with ease.

    Shazam: music tagger – I love this so I can identify songs that I’ve never heard of before. Try it at Old Navy.

    Wireless Tether for Root Users
    : This allows your phone to be a wireless access point. Handy for when your hotel wants to charge you 15.00 a day for internet access.

    ConnectBot
    : Awesome SSH client – this even allows port forwarding.

    Transdroid: this lets me monitor my linux distro torrents from the comfort of my couch. Also scans barcodes and searches for applicable torrents.

    Did I miss any must-have apps? Let me know!

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel